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God has given Water to the World as the Holy sacrament gift and ordered not to tolerate spoiling water, for He has not done it.

In our lifetime – our days filled with perpetual race for all kinds of benefits, wealth, the lifetime of the oil idol and the golden calf, – only belief in Water and devotion to Water, its miracle cure for securing health, for soil fertility, for saving the beautiful all can put the will of God into action!

The site posts popular articles, essays and other useful information about water as a unique natural resource. We look forward to receiving your feedback regarding the site CLEAN WATER SPACE.

Acidified ocean water widespread along North American West Coast

A three-year survey of the California Current System along the West Coast of the United States found persistent, highly acidified water throughout this ecologically critical nearshore habitat, with “hotspots” of pH measurements as low as any oceanic surface waters in the world.

Tidepool organisms are threatened by acidification.

The researchers say that conditions will continue to worsen because the atmospheric carbon dioxide primarily to blame for this increase in acidification has been rising substantially in recent years.

One piece of good news came out of the study, which was published this week in Scientific Reports. There are “refuges” of more moderate pH environments that could become havens for some marine organisms to escape more highly acidified waters, and which could be used as a resource for ecosystem management. Read more

Milk better than water to rehydrate kids, study finds

Active children need to be watered with milk. It’s a more effective way of countering dehydration than a sports drink or water itself, say researchers at McMaster University.

McMaster University graduate student Kim Volterman monitors research participant Paige Leonard’s heart rate in the climate chamber at the Children’s Exercise and Nutrition Centre of McMaster University and the McMaster Children’s Hospital.

That’s particularly important during hot summer weather, says Brian Timmons, research director of the Child Health and Exercise Medicine Program at McMaster and principal investigator of the study.

“Children become dehydrated during exercise, and it’s important they get enough fluids, particularly before going into a second round of a game. Milk is better than either a sports drink or water because it is a source of high quality protein, carbohydrates, calcium and electrolytes.” Read more

Water and Radiation on Saturn’s Moon Enceladus Can be Conditions for Life

Specialists of the University of Texas at San Antonio (USA) have found that microorganisms can live in water that has been exposed to radiation. Suitable conditions are on several celestial bodies, including Enceladus, the satellite of Saturn.

The source of radioactive radiation on Enceladus can be rocks that are close in composition to chondrites – the most common type of meteorites that contain uranium, potassium and thorium. And the existence of the oceans of water on Enceladus is very likely. Read more

Water balance creates a threshold in soil pH at the global scale

Soil pH regulates the capacity of soils to store and supply nutrients, and thus contributes substantially to controlling productivity in terrestrial ecosystems.

However, soil pH is not an independent regulator of soil fertility—rather, it is ultimately controlled by environmental forcing. In particular, small changes in water balance cause a steep transition from alkaline to acid soils across natural climate gradients.

Although the processes governing this threshold in soil pH are well understood, the threshold has not been quantified at the global scale, where the influence of climate may be confounded by the effects of topography and mineralogy. Here we evaluate the global relationship between water balance and soil pH by extracting a spatially random sample (n = 20,000) from an extensive compilation of 60,291 soil pH measurements. Read more

Sour taste cells detect water

New research from Caltech shows that sour-sensing taste cells play an important role in detecting water on the tongue.

The work, appearing in a paper in the May 29 issue of the journal Nature Neuroscience, was done in the laboratory of Yuki Oka, assistant professor of biology.

“The tongue can detect various key nutrient factors, called tastants — such as sodium, sugar, and amino acids — through taste,” says Oka. “However, how we sense water in the mouth was unknown. Many insect species are known to ‘taste’ water, so we imagined that mammals also might have a machinery in the taste system for water detection.”

Taste cells relay information about tastants to the brain via nerves called the taste nerves. First author and graduate student Dhruv Zocchi measured the electrical responses from taste nerves in mice to various tastants as well as to water. The nerves responded in predictable ways to different basic tastes — sweet, sour, bitter, salty, and umami — but they were also stimulated by pure water. “This was exciting because it implied that some taste cells are capable of detecting water,” Zocchi says. Read more